The fall of gender stereotyping in Zambia | Women’s migration from unpaid to paid work

Women can do what men can do! This is a popular gender slogan in Zambia today. The picture was different until recently. Under the British rule, Zambian women were trained in domestic skills for cheaply supporting and maintaining a healthy male workforce. Even after the independence, women continued to focus on unpaid care work, which is devalued in the market economy. So they were dependent, passive and socially isolated. However, in the 1980s the country’s indebted-economy was restructured and then copper prices fell as the industry was increasingly mechanised. All these contributed to halving the mining jobs over the 1990s and the era of full (male) employment coupled with social security came to an end. This made women to seek paid work, diluting gender stereotyping. Still, women are now burdened with both paid as well as traditional unpaid work. Shouldn’t men do more to share this burden?

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Original story | Holding Up Half the Sky: How Zambia’s Women went from Housewives to Breadwinners http://thinkafricapress.com/zambia/glass-half-full-gender-equality-copperbelt


HEC Global Learning London Web suite
Central platform | http://www.globallearninglondon.org.uk/
Teachers’ and Global Citizens’ website | Global Footprints http://www.globalfootprints.org/
Young people’s website | East End Talking http://www.eastendtalking.org.uk/
Organisational/training website | HEC Global Learning website http://hecgloballearning.org.uk/

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Localise the global MDGs – Listen to the real experts on the ground

A UNDP Policy Adviser on Poverty, MDGs and Human Development has an interesting story to tell. Several years ago, at a conference on the Darfur conflict, after the experts presented their research findings and contradicting suggestions, a Darfur pastoralist stood up and asked what they, the locals, should do. Came the reply from another local wise man: ‘Stop listening to the experts and outsiders.’ Continuing his story, the UNDP advisor says that, when it comes to MDGs acceleration, for example, views of those directly affected are important. A number of countries have successfully progressed in their MDG journeys by unlocking the bottlenecks of their existing strategies rather than developing new ones by listening to external experts. The MDG journeys should be guided by the real experts on the ground, he concludes.

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Original story http://www.developmentprogress.org/blog/2013/09/25/art-possible-listening-real-experts
MDGs (Millennium Development Goals) http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/

 

HEC Global Learning London Web suite
Central platform | http://www.globallearninglondon.org.uk/
Teachers’ and Global Citizens’ website | Global Footprints http://www.globalfootprints.org/
Young people’s website | East End Talking http://www.eastendtalking.org.uk/
Organisational/training website | HEC Global Learning website http://hecgloballearning.org.uk/

Self-educated Malawi windmill boy’s battle for water and energy

In 2002, Malawi faced a severe drought that killed thousands and teenager William Kamkwamba’s family, like many others, were threatened with starvation. Unable to afford fees any more, he ended schooling at 14 but his dream lived on – the dream of bringing electricity and running water to his village. For education, he turned to the local library, where he came across a tattered text book with a wind mill. Soon, using waste such as plastic pipes and a tractor fan blade, he built a 5-metre windmill, bringing electricity to his community. In 2006, he built a more powerful windmill to pump water for irrigation. Eventually, he became the subject of a book published in the US, The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind. Today, in twenties, William aims to bring power, not just to the rest of his village, but to his nation, where only 2% have access to electricity.

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Original story: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/africa/8257153.stm
The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind http://www.harpercollins.com/browseinside/index.aspx?isbn13=9780061730320

 

HEC Global Learning London Web suite
Central platform | http://www.globallearninglondon.org.uk/
Teachers’ and Global Citizens’ website | Global Footprints http://www.globalfootprints.org/
Young people’s website | East End Talking http://www.eastendtalking.org.uk/
Organisational/training website | HEC Global Learning website http://hecgloballearning.org.uk/